Active Dry Yeast vs. RapidRise Yeast


 

Active Dry Yeast

RapidRise Yeast

Dissolve yeast in ¼ cup warm (100-110˚F) water before using. Always use a thermometer to check temperature.

Add yeast to dry ingredients.

“Proofing” (checking if yeast is active) is not needed; it’s nearly 100% active thanks to modern production and packaging.*

Proofing not needed.

Add dissolved yeast to other ingredients according to recipe instructions.

Add liquids heated to 120˚F to 130˚F and follow recipe instructions. Always use a thermometer to check temperature.

For most doughs:

1. Knead; let rise until double

2. Shape; let rise until double

3. Bake.

For most doughs:

1. Knead; let rest 10 minutes

2. Shape; let rise until double

3. Bake.

Don’t use in recipes calling for Rapid Rise yeast. (Yeast won’t dissolve properly, and water is too hot.)

May use in recipes calling for Active Dry yeast. (However, rise may be slightly less.)

This yeast may be substituted for the Fresh Cake Yeast. The small cake yeast (.6 oz) is equal to 1 envelope of dry yeast. The large cake yeast (2 oz) is equal to 3 envelopes of dry yeast.

This yeast is the same as Bread Machine Yeast and Instant Yeast. (Instant Yeast is the a 1 pound package of Fleischmann’s Yeast sold at Sam’s Club.)

Comes in both an envelope and a jar. Active Dry Yeast has a red bar at the bottom of the label.

Comes in both an envelope and a jar. RapidRise Yeast has a blue bar at the bottom of the label.

“*Proofing has traditionally been done by dissolving yeast in ¼ cup warm (100-110˚F) water, stirring in 1 teaspoon sugar and waiting 10 minutes. The mixture should foam and double in volume.”